WHO Issues New Sugar Guidelines Sure to Be Dismissed by Most

"Sucre blanc cassonade complet rapadura" by Romain Behar - Own work. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sucre_blanc_cassonade_complet_rapadura.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Sucre_blanc_cassonade_complet_rapadura.jpg
Sugars; clockwise from top-left: White refined, unrefined, brown, unprocessed cane “Sucre blanc cassonade complet rapadura” by Romain Behar – Own work. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sucre_blanc_cassonade_complet_rapadura.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Sucre_blanc_cassonade_complet_rapadura.jpg

London, England – One of the most common statements made by people who do not believe in a deity is that rather than trust an unknown being, they trust or believe in science. Well, it seems they’ll get their chance to demonstrate that faith where it matters: their diet. It turns out that the World Health Organization (WHO) is not keen on processed sugar in people’s diets. They recommend that people reduce the number of calories they consume daily from sugar to between 5 and 10 percent of their total caloric intake. In the United States, the average person consumes 268 calories from sugar daily. Put another way, the average American literally eats 18 teaspoons of sugar every day.

Now, in all fairness, the sugar being consumed isn’t all from white junk processed sugar. It can come in natural forms such as local honey and fresh fruit. Still, a single can of soda will meet the daily processed sugar requirement as per the WHO’s guidelines. Professor Tom Sanders, who teaches nutrition at King’s College in London, pointed out that a single glass of orange juice would exceed the WHO’s guideline. It should be noted that Prof. Sanders did not take part in the WHO study. Also, the guidelines on sugar do not apply to types of sugar that occur naturally in healthy food such as fresh fruit, milk, and vegetables.

In short, it may be surmised that the WHO is asking people to drastically reduce the presence of junk sugar from their diet. These are the type of sweeteners found in fruit juices sweetened with high fructose corn syrup, sodas, candies, pastries and other confections. It is well known that a high sugar intake contributes to tooth decay and obesity. The results of the study were first announced last year but were finalized on Wednesday.

Source material:
http://www.denverpost.com/nationworld/ci_27646189/u-n-recommends-cutting-sugar-5-10-percent?source=infinite

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